Vintage Hat Friday

Greetings fellow hat lovers,

Today’s entry is in response to last Friday’s post, where I featured a glorious hat by Laddie Northridge. A member of the Mad Hatters Society on Facebook shared a photo of her Laddie hat, a black version of today’s hat, although it looks as if hers has a larger crown. Today’s featured hat does not have a label inside so I don’t know who designed it.

The hat featured below is so unique! I wonder where the original owner wore it. And I’d love to have seen her entire outfit. It’s clearly a high-quality hat; the base is a beautiful beaver fur felt with a lovely sheen that’s surrounded by many hand-curled burnt ostrich feathers that were sewn on by hand, along with the narrow satin band and bow. If you’ve never tried sewing feathers to a hat, let me tell you it’s a challenge – they definitely have a mind of their own. All I can say is Wow!

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From the back

From the back

Vintage Hat Friday

Greetings, Vintage Hat Lovers!

Today’s post features a hat that’s as charming and practical today as it was when it was made. The label is from R.H. Macy & Co., Inc. New York. This sweet topper is made from wool felt with a band of Persian Lamb across the front. The top of the hat features intricately woven strips of wool felt that create a pretty design that mimics the Persian Lamb. The original hat pin is still intact. I have restored this piece with a new inner grosgrain ribbon band and have added a very narrow black headband so that it stays put on the head.

I can envision this hat on a pretty woman shopping downtown in the late 1940s, early 1950s. Understated and chic!

Vintage topper front

Vintage topper front

Vintage topper side

Vintage topper side

Vintage Topper Back

Vintage Topper Back

Vintage Hat Friday

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Good Morning, hat enthusiasts! This Friday’s featured vintage hat is a sweet little confection that can’t help but make you smile. It’s a perch hat, named for the way it sits perched on the head. It would be worn at an angle or perhaps down on the forehead a bit. The seafoam green feathers are gently swirled with a few terra cotta colored feather added for contrast.

As collectors, we continually learn new things. This hat has a tiny little veil on the back section. It’s too small to be a snood, so I posted a question on the Facebook page for the Mad Hatters Society if anyone had seen this feature on a hat before. I learned (thanks, Sue and Brenda!) that it is probably a very rare type of holder that uses a Bakelite hair pin to attach the mesh into the hair. My piece also has the narrow elastic band that slips behind the ears. Apparently, this type of holder was used on theatre costume hats – I’m guessing the extra anchor was designed to avoid having the hat come off if one was dancing or acting on the stage.

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The hat was made by G. Howard Hodge (1891-1966). Hodge was involved in the millinery business nearly all of his life, starting out in San Francisco and eventually establishing himself in New York City in the late 1920s. His creations were considered by the press to be inventive and were made with quality materials for the higher end of the market. I’m guessing today’s featured hat is from the 1950s, or perhaps the late ‘40s.

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To see another tilt with the Bakelite hair pin attached, visit:. http://www.hatatorium.com/…/Milliner/NYCreations/204d